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Water Block Design / Construction Building your own block? Need info on designing one? Heres where to do it

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Unread 07-19-2004, 12:48 PM   #1
Techmasta
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Default Design critique?

Can you guys please let me know if there are any major flaws with this design? I drew the image to scale and then scanned it.
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Unread 07-19-2004, 01:40 PM   #2
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Top view? Hard to tell anything from the side view.
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Unread 07-19-2004, 02:48 PM   #3
Techmasta
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Ok, I'll have to draw it up.

BTW can someone tell me what a standard hole size is for a 1/2" barb?
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Unread 07-19-2004, 03:46 PM   #4
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Ok here is the top view of the wb and a version of the first image on 1/4" graph paper.

The slit in the center hole is a thin, circular piece of copper that is attached to a smaller ring of copper which fits inside the hole drilled in the base, there is a 1/16" space for the water to flow around the ring.. The copper piece goes right below the center barb and hopefully can use the threads to adjust the distance between the ring and the base. The water flows in between the two different sized rings and toward the two sides where the water exits.

These are just sketches and I haven't finalized any of the dimensions yet. Let me know if any of my ideas won't work or won't work well.
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Unread 07-19-2004, 08:50 PM   #5
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You must be new

This idea:
http://forums.procooling.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=6101
eventually turned into the Cascade block.

You're on the right track. You might get more performance if you allow more space between the baseplate and that inlet (a.k.a inlet nozzle). 3.5 times the diameter ought to do.

BTW, the ID may vary for that connection, but you might look into NPT (National Pipe Thread) specifications for the other dimensions.
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Unread 07-19-2004, 09:28 PM   #6
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I read that thread yesterday. Your idea inspired me. I was just wondering what performance benefit a big hole would offer. I know that the smaller tubes and cups will be better but maybe it would give a little performance boost over the regular way of putting holes or dimples in the base.

Thanks for the performance tip!
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Unread 07-19-2004, 09:51 PM   #7
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I'd be interested in seeing results on that, let us know, ok?

The design otherwise was meant to reduce the baseplate to a real minimum, because it was a design limit with previous blocks. The multi-hole has the advantage of acting both as fins, and help the structure.

Your design can probably go very thin, but you'll probably be limited by what the clamping pressure is going to do to it. You ought to be able to reach a 1mm baseplate, lower if it holds. Cascade is a hair...
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Unread 07-19-2004, 09:58 PM   #8
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Why make the distance between the nozzle and the baseplate higher? Would that not reduce turbulence? It seems that this guy needs more turbulence as he is not utilizing a lot of surface area.
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Unread 07-19-2004, 10:19 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigben2k
I'd be interested in seeing results on that, let us know, ok?
Definitely. I have to come up with a real simple way of making it though. I don't have a mill at my disposal. This is a just a prototype block so I'm not worried about not having a mill. Maybe in the future I'll look into having it milled if it doesn't suck. Would it be easier to make the top out of acrylic or copper if all I had was a drill press and dremel?

It would be nice if jaydee did invest in that expensive miller and mill stuff for people like me.
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Unread 07-19-2004, 11:39 PM   #10
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You can make this with a drill press, easy.

Yeah an acrylic top would be ideal. It also lets you see what's going on. You don't want to know what I was thinking of using for Radius...
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Unread 07-19-2004, 11:59 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigben2k
You don't want to know what I was thinking of using for Radius...
Butter?

Would a 1/4" acrylic sheet be enough or should I go thicker?

For the copper base would 1/4" be too thick, maybe 1/8"? If I went with the thinner base would the hole have tall enough walls to give the desired effect?

And since I don't have a mill and can't make an O-ring channel, what would be the preferable way to seal the pieces? Is marine or plumbers goop clear? I don't want the block to look nasty.

BTW thank you for the help bb2k. Sorry for all the questions.
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Unread 07-20-2004, 04:54 PM   #12
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I'd recomend 1/2" in acrylic. Remember that you'll need some substance to span the gap, between the inlet and the baseplate. I'd only consider 1/4" in polycarbonate (but I'm still going with 1/2" ). I'm opting to glue two sheets of 1/4" together, to make that 1/2" thickness. IPS Weld-On #4 will do this with a clear finish, for polycarb or acrylic.

1/4" thick copper would be perfect for a start. Many DIY block-makers here use RTV silicone to seal their blocks. Goop is mostly clear, but if you seal it around the edges, it'll look just fine, regardless of the color.

I can't really advise you on how deep the center hole should be, that's really up to your design. One factor to consider is how large it is, compared to where it sits over a CPU core. Other than that I can tell you that the fins on White Water and Radius are less than 5 mm high, actually 4mm high if I remember right.
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Unread 07-20-2004, 05:30 PM   #13
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Do you have any suggestions for the size of the space between the top piece of acrylic and the base? Like where the water flows.
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Unread 07-20-2004, 05:57 PM   #14
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It's not terribly important, as long as there's something there for the water to leave. What's important is the distance between the exit of the inlet, and the base, and it should be 3.5 times the ID of the inlet. Experiment.
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Unread 07-20-2004, 06:03 PM   #15
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Does that 3.5x ID work if there is more than one outlet?
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Unread 07-20-2004, 08:18 PM   #16
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Yes, the theory applies to each individual jet.

Check out this text (and site)
http://www.electronics-cooling.com/h...01_may_a2.html
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Unread 07-20-2004, 08:36 PM   #17
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The inlet meaning the jet size correct? What if the jet holes weren't round? What if they were rectangles or squares?
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Unread 07-20-2004, 09:05 PM   #18
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If they're not round, then you're on your own!

Actually you can calculate the equivalent round size to just about anything. www.lmnoeng.com has all the formulaes posted. In short, the resulting ID would be close to the narrowest dimension of a rectangle.
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